Pascha nostrum immolátus est Christus, allelúia

Itaque epulémur in ázymis sinceritátis et veritátis, allelúia, allelúia, allelúia.

Friend and reader: I wish you, your family, and all your loved ones a very happy Easter.

Six years to the day.

On the morning of 22 November 2016, I switched on the TV and allowed the morning news to play in the background whilst I got ready for another day of sightseeing. Suddenly, normal broadcasting was interrupted and warnings began to flash, with reports coming in thick and fast of a major earthquake that had just taken place off the coast of Fukushima Prefecture. Despite the fact that I was a very great distance west of where it struck – at that point in my journey I was staying in Matsuyama, on the island of Shikoku – the urgent warnings raised uncomfortable thoughts about an earlier event, far worse than the present one. What I found most chilling of all was the message delivered by the newsreaders as the tsunami warnings were broadcast: Isoide nigete kudasai.

Three words, spoken calmly yet with uncompromising firmness, over and over and over again.

Remember and pray, even as one looks to the future with hope.

I don’t do Valentine’s Day. Let’s watch a video of Seungjae instead.

You are welcome. (^_^)

新年明けましておめでとうございます

Greeting the new year K-ON style

Diego happily wishes you all the best in the year ahead. ~(‾⌣‾~)

Læténtur coeli…

christmas-2016

…et exsúltet terra ante fáciem Dómini: quóniam venit.

Diego wishes you, your family, and all your loved ones a very happy Christmas.

Well, he got the long vowel on the first syllable right. That’s better than most. (^_^)

Our little Daebak from the KBS show The Return of Superman has just been to Ōsaka with his family. Of course, his mum couldn’t resist posting this brief clip of the toddling celebrity trying to enunciate his present whereabouts.

#오사카 #사요나라👋 #osaka #さようなら

A post shared by 오남매맘 (@jeshia2) on

Incidentally, it’s been 10 years and 10 days since I published my very first post on this blog. I say, we’ve been around for quite some time, now haven’t we?

Cheerio.

Travel expands one’s horizons … and one’s vocabulary

Hyouka_12_22

Holidaying in Japan can be quite the educational exercise, and it often requires no more than switching on the telly and tuning into the morning news. (A good habit to have whilst getting dressed for another day of sightseeing, if only to learn what the weather will be like.) In the course of the viewing, one tends to pick up certain words that keep being repeated due to their increased relevance at a particular moment in time.

For example, I was in the country during the 2014 Winter Olympics, and the pervasive coverage of Japan’s performance in Sochi led me to learn a new word: senshu (選手), in this context used as an occupational honorific after competing athletes’ names (e.g., Hanyū-senshu). A rather severe raft of snowstorms also took place during that period, frequent news reports of which added another word to my arsenal: ōyuki (大雪), referring to heavy snow.

I’ve just returned from my 12th holiday in Japan, accompanied not merely by bags of socially obligatory omiyage and a rather bad head cold probably caught from a fellow commuter on the train somewhere, but by yet another fresh item for my linguistic catalogue: jikidaitōryō (次期大統領), meaning “president-elect”.

I don’t think I need even mention the chap whose dominance of news reports during my stay has drilled this new word into my head. (^_^)