Are you a Japanese museum featuring obscure subject matter that’s looking to raise visitor numbers and get rid of unsold past-exhibition catalogues? Here’s something worth looking into…

…because it’s a fact of life that people will visit something they’ve seen or heard about in a game.

And, as it turns out, they’ll buy the old stuff in your museum shop, too.

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My brother’s been bugging me to get him one of these – and it’s not the new iPhone.

No, I’m talking about this.

And today, thanks to a brief note on the official site, I’ve learned that he’ll have to wait until next year to get one. (Assuming I manage to seize one of these from a store in Japan before they run out … again.)

Oh, happy solitude

Not everyone will view the trend described in this recent Japan Times article as positive, but I certainly think it’s an encouraging development.

After all, it’s no mystery – at least to those who know me – why I dine out at Ichiran so frequently whenever I holiday in Japan. (Here’s a review I wrote of one particular Ichiran branch; note that the seating arrangements described there are standard across their branches.) They’ve got delicious Hakata-style ramen, true enough. But more than that, the individual booth seats allow me to enjoy my meal in near-complete privacy, without having to look at another human being … or worry about anyone else looking at me.

As an incurably anti-social traveller, the prospect of being able to limit my interactions with the rest of humanity to the barest minimum is welcome news indeed. (^_^)

Darn it. One day too late.

My next holiday in Japan is supposed to begin on 30 September. One day too late, it seems, for me to experience this limited-time-only themed restaurant bus.

Not that I would’ve altered my bookings even if I’d known about it in advance, but still … darn it.

(Incidentally, I still haven’t seen the film, nor do I really plan to. But I’m still enough of an anime enthusiast to appreciate special events like this.)

I didn’t know Fegelein did Korean movies, too.

I say, this chap does get around, doesn’t he?

Depending on how much screen time he gets, this could be yet another Hitler-rant parody gold mine.

That aside, Korean history is one of my areas of interest, so the film’s depiction of the Gwangju Uprising alone is a major selling point as far as I’m concerned.

It’s been a long time since I’ve been to the movies…

…and truth be told, nothing that’s been released lately has managed to do much more than lightly pique my interest. Case in point: despite being something of a fan of Shinkai Makoto’s previous works, I never bothered to watch 君の名は。 even once in the three times that I visited Japan since it was released there in August 2016. (I did go so far as to look up cinema schedules for it on a free evening in Tōkyō, but didn’t follow through.)

Ah, but this particular film might have just enough appeal to break my long drought when it enters local cinemas next month. The visual aesthetic isn’t really my cup of tea, but the theme most certainly is, especially since I’m currently blogging about a long 2016 holiday in Japan that included Hiroshima.

Pascha nostrum immolátus est Christus, allelúia

Itaque epulémur in ázymis sinceritátis et veritátis, allelúia, allelúia, allelúia.

Friend and reader: I wish you, your family, and all your loved ones a very happy Easter.